AGGREGATED ASSAULT!

Accept

4.4
Free Metal E-Mail









New Users Sign Up

Connect. Befriend. Follow.

Share |



Other swag here
metal rules swag



Death SS
Resurrection
June 2013
Released: 2013, Scarlet Records
Rating: 2.0/5
Reviewer: Metal-Rules.com UK Team

The legendary Italian band Death SS have delivered their latest record “Resurrection”, 7 years after their last full length album “The 7th Seal”. Though the band’s early material is more Heavy Metal oriented with some Goth and even proto-Black Metal musical elements thrown in, during the 1990’s Death SS’ sound shifted toward a more industrial rock style. “Resurrection” finds the band still dwelling within that industrial rock influenced sound, which honestly makes the band sound a derivative at times. While there are sections in the music that tease the listener into thinking that the group will break out of the industrial rock mode and into their old approach, the record really just sort of stays trapped within their new style.



“Revived” kicks off the album with a danceable beat combined with Goth Rock keyboards and Metal riffs, and it sort of lays the groundwork for what the listener is to expect during the rest of the album.



While the song has a pounding chorus and crunchy guitars, the band throws in some dance and techno interludes that in all honesty, have been used too many times by dozens of bands. The riff heavy songs “The Crimson Shine” and “Darkest Night” remind me of the band …And Oceans, and again make the listener wish that the band would bring their guitar riffs to the forefront and ditch the rest of the Industrial Rock and Techno music sounds.



In the past, the band would throw in keyboards that sounded like the haunted movie soundtracks that Fabio Frizzi or groups like Goblin would record for Dario Argento or Lucio Fulci films. That would have been a big plus if incorporated on some of the songs on this record; however, the keyboards here sound like what you would hear at a Rave or Techno danceclub. “Eaters” ,which in my understanding is to be the band’s lead single to promote this record, is also plagued with the very same issues that I have discussed.



There is also the element of sameness between songs that starts to creep in after a few minutes of listening to the record. In essence, about the only thing that I can recommend from this album is the song “Ogre’s Lullaby”. It actually reminded me a bit of their classic “Black Mass” song, with some Black Sabbath riffs thrown in along with eerie sounds and weird vocalizations. It is the only moment during the whole album in which I truly since any type of ‘resurrection’ or rekindling of the old fire from the band.



I don’t think this album will appeal to many, not even Industrial Rock fans, basically because most of what the band has incorporated into their sound has been done a million times. It’s a shame, because Death SS is blessed with some great musicians, and the band are more than capable of delivering a solid album, as proven in the past.



Apparently now the band is satisfied with merely delivering collections of songs that attempt to be hit singles, instead of records with songs that meld with one another thematically in order to create an ambiance, like in the past. I can understand the fact that a band should experiment with new sounds, but experimenting with new sounds and changing your style of music to achieve a broader appeal are two different things.



Review by Titus Isaac
Track Listing

1. Revived
2. The Crimson Shrine
3. The Darkest Night
4 Dionysus
5. Eaters
6. Star In Sight
7. Ogre's Lullaby
8. Santa Muerte
9. The Devil's Graal
10. The Song Of Adoration
11. Precognition
12. Bad Luck

Lineup

Steve Sylvester - Vocals (lead)
Freddy Delirio - Keyboards
Glenn Strange - Bass
Al De Noble - Guitars
Bozo Wolff - Drums


Next review: » Death Strike - Fuckin' Death
Previous review: » Death Shriek - Volume 1





Home | About Metal-Rules.com | Staff | Advertise With Us | Staff Openings | Donations

Content is © 2009-2012 Metal-Rules.com. All Rights Reserved.
Graphics by Hammerblaze studio.