Heart of Steel: Interviews


Interview with guitarists Juan Garcia, Bernie Versailles, & vocalist Bruce Hall of Agent Steel

Interview By EvilG and Arto Lehtinen
Promo pics courtesy of Agent Steel


Current Agent Steel Line-up
Juan Garcia - Guitars
Bernie Versailles - Guitars
Bruce Hall - Vocals
Karlos Medina - Bass
Rigo Amezcua - Drums


How does it feel to have released one of the best albums in ALL of heavy metal for 2003?? (I’m not blowing smoke – I mean it!)

Bruce Hall:
Obviously, to make you feel that way is a good thing. Seems a lot of people have the same reaction and, for me, anyway, it is kind of vindicating.

Bernie:
It's a good feeling knowing that we are moving forward musically, without abandoning our fans of our early stuff. Anything a band releases, they should be proud of it, whether people think it sucks or not, but so far everybody digs it, so it's that much more validating.

Juan: That is a huge compliment!! I know that "Order of the illuminati" is an unique metal album and we take pride in making the best albums we are capable of. We wanted this new record to be special and one that will endure the test of time.

 

 

When did you realize just how killer the new album was, was it when you were recording, or once you started seeing the reaction from fans and the press?

Bernie:
It was definitely during the recording process. After the drums were recorded, I knew we were on to something big. Then when the vocals were finished, I felt that this just might be our best album to date.

Bruce Hall:
I knew when it was written that it was a really good record. As much as I like getting all the positive responses, fan and press reaction has nothing to do with my opinion of anyone's record, our own included.

Juan:
I; myself had no idea how the album would turn out. All I knew for sure was that I wanted the new songs to be more meaningful and overall better than "Omega Conspiracy". Once we started to receive high rankings in Europe on the review charts; I knew we had it.

 

 

Your last album (OMEGA CONSPIRACY) was first released in 1999. Did you have to take this four year break because of the legal problems with your former vocalist, John Cyriss?!

Juan:
There were mis-communications nothing more. In fact, Cyriis supports AGENT STEEL and we've spoken on the phone and we came to an agreement that the best thing is to keep AGENT STEEL moving forward because the world needs quality metal. We wish him (Cyriis) the best, and support his musical workings and if there's anything I can do to help out I will.

 

 

Did Aliens finally adopt John Cyriiss by bringing back to his home planet too early - because Cyriis thought it would happen in a year of 2011?!?

Juan:
Come on now let's have some respect; Cyriis is doing well; he's got some great new kick music. This whole thing with 2011 is something I researched; it's a fact that the Mayan calendar runs out at 2012. 2011 was a working title/concept that we were creating; the press got a hold of it and twisted it like everything else in this world.

 

 

Drummer Chuck Profus decided to pull out of Agent Steel and was replaced by Rigo Amezcua. Obviously it wasn't an easy task to find a replacement, how did Amezcua get hooked by AS and why did Chuck leave?

Bruce Hall:
Chuck left, primarily, because he was tired of all the music biz bullshit (there is a ton of it). He was also having some health related issues that expedited his decision. Rigo played with Juan and Karlos in Terror. They knew he was totally capable.

 

 

Wasn't bassist Michael Zaputil involved in the AS reunion in the first place even though he didn't play on Omega?

Bernie:
What's sad is that Mike saw us play in Phoenix about a year later, and he was completely blown away. He wanted to be back in the band, but there was no way that could happen. He got severely depressed and went home, logged on to our message board, and told everybody he wanted to put a bullet in his head. Maybe he was speaking figuratively, but in any case he was pretty sad. I truly felt bad for him.

Bruce Hall:
Yeah, Mike was involved in the beginning but he had outside interests that interfered with his continuing. It was hard for all of us when Mike quit.

 















 

Why did you end up on the Italian Scarlet Records, what convinced you about their promises to invest in Agent Steel in terms of promotion and so on? (And Metal Blade isn't involved this time?!?)

Juan:
We ended up on Scarlet because they were supportive and into AGENT STEEL, so it made sense to go with a label that believes in the band and are fans of the music. The Metal Blade deal was a licensing deal for the United States; they have rights to "Omega Conspiracy".

 

 

The Scarlet label has a lot of power and prog bands and a few extreme bands, like the mighty Necrodeath, a couple of Danish bands Invocator and Hatesphere, etc. Do you think AS fits well to the Scarlet line up??!

Bruce Hall:
Really, I don't think we "fit" with any labels roster. We are pretty alone in the way we play the type of music we do.

Juan:
What is important for us is a label that supports and promotes AGENT STEEL and I think Scarlet is doing their job. Do we fit their roster? I am not sure and I don't really care if we do or not; what I care about and what I am thankful for is that our new album "Order of the illuminati" is available in Europe through the proper distribution networks and available for the metalheads!!!!

 

 

How has the cooperation worked so far with the Italian label and is dealing with a label so far away challenging?

Bruce Hall:
That still really remains to be seen. So far, it's been okay but it could be a lot better.

Juan:
Life is challenging and there is always room for improvement whether it's with a record company or with a band or with oneself.

 

 

Is your deal with this label just for this album or did you sign a multi-album deal?

Bruce Hall:
It is a one off deal. I think they may have an option but that's it.

Juan:
If the money is right we can always re-negotiate the deal. We will see how things develop and we are planning on sitting down drinking some beer and speaking with our label in Europe real soon. I will also like to mention that Scarlet will be releasing "Earth Under Lucifer" single with bonus live songs available on the tour.

 

 

You were supposed to have “Order of the Illuminati” as a new name for the band because of the legal hassles with Cyriis, but after all you decided to use it for the album title. Did you find the title too cool to throw away?

Juan:
Exactly, it is a great title isn't it? I use to read Robert Anton Wilson like almost 20 years ago and was always intrigued with conspiracies and UFO's and all sorts of stuff like that. Bruce came up with the title and I thought it was cool.

 

 

Where did you discover the name “Order of the Illuminati” (perhaps you are members of the order? hehe). What is its association with Freemasonry and the “New World Order”? Do you know of The Order of the Illuminati’s influence in today’s world, or do you think it's fictitious?

Bruce Hall:
Me and Chuck came up with the name. We are definitely not members of their group. I think they are real and they influence the world to a great degree.

 

 

Has Cyriiss given up his idea that he “owns” the name “Agent Steel”, has the war ended or just a single battle in this conflict?

Juan:
Cyriis is supportive of AGENT STEEL! there is no war, no battle, like I said it was a big miscommunication with a lawyer and not talking for over a decade. I think the media has been rather harsh on Cyriis; when in fact he wants what we all want...for Metal to be back on top.

 

 

Does it bug you if the new AS album is categorized (by some) as power metal, even though the album contains true AS speed metal?

Bruce Hall:
What people call "power metal" these days has nothing to do with power or metal. On the other hand, we really are power metal as it was defined initially.

Juan:
It doesn't bother me too much what they categorize us. I know what we are and I know our roots.

Bernie:
Seems like everyone has a different definition of "power metal" these days. I've noticed that certain fans hear what they want to hear in our music, and that's how they perceive us. Which ever way someone connects to the music is their own personal experience. We do have "speed" and "power" and "melody", and we mix it up quite a bit. We're different things to different people. So truthfully, being categorized doesn't mean anything to me.

 

 

The Omega album had a lot of references to older 80's speed metal whereas the new album has a slightly more modern style. Would you agree with that, and if so, what do YOU think made the album sound a bit more modern?

Bruce Hall:
I don't really think of either album as being particularly retro or modern. I see them as solid, timeless metal. I am not very interested in trends.

Bernie:
If you hear a slight modern influence, it's probably because it's there. Being musicians, we're always listening to music, and there's a lot of new stuff out there. Whether you know it or not, that new favorite song of yours just might sway you ever so slightly in your songwriting. You can stay true to your style, but the brain is like a sponge, and it absorbs stuff you're not even aware of.

Juan:
I think Bernie makes a good point. I also think the new album is a natural evolution in the AGENT STEEL sound; it has been 4 years since "Omega Conspiracy" so our sound is gonna evolve, but we made it a conscious effort to have the songs written in standard tuning (No drop tuning at all). I think Bruce is correct as well it is timeless metal.

 

 

Speaking of sounds….the guitar sound on this album is excellent for both leads and rhythms. I think in terms of the leads you’ve both really outdone yourselves! Did you plan to have even better and more ripping solos on this album than the last or did it just work out that way?

Bernie:
Juan and I have been holding out all these years to play our best solos. Just kidding. Of course, we want to play our best at any given moment. But, I think we took a little more time and patience in this case. And with every passing year, if you're steadily practicing, it's only natural that you get better and gain more licks for your arsenal.

Juan:
Thanks for the compliments; the more you practice the better one gets. Extra effort is always welcomed in a recording session; as a guitar team we pushed ourselves, and we could have pushed more but we needed to get this album done and released.

Bruce Hall:
I think those two meant to do their best, like we all did.

 

 

Do you feel there is any friendly competition to outplay one another, like if one of you records and nails down this amazing lead, does the other go…”shit I have to try to top that” ha!

Bernie:
It's not like we try to outdo each other. It's more of trying to match the feel, or contrast each other so things stay interesting.

Juan:
It's not about competition and if it was I would loose that battle, Bernie is an outstanding top notch lead guitarist; he outshines a lot of player and that is why he is in AGENT STEEL, but I get what you are saying....and yes I said "Shit, fuck, damm it, I got to try to top or match that LOL" but in all honesty, It's about the song, the riff, the drums, the melody, the bass and lyrics, solos are the icing on the cake.

 

 

For the gear-heads and guitar geeks out there….please tell us what setup/effects/guitars/amps/etc. you use to record the rhythms and leads.

Bernie:
We used Line 6 pods, Mesa Boogie and Laney cabinets. The Laney's were actually owned by Jay of White Zombie. When he started using Randall, he sold them to me for $75 a piece. What a deal! Thanks Jay! Anyway, I also use a custom preamp that I'm always tweaking and modifying constantly. I'm never completely happy with my sound. And I think that's a good thing.

Juan:
Line 6 POD (Recording), Mesa Boogie MK IV w/Mesa Boogie Cabinets. Various Boss pedals like Chorus Box, 7-Band EQ. Guitars: Jackson KV w/EMG pick ups, Fernandes Vortex V w/EMG pick ups & Sustainer, Fernandes Vertigo, Jackson RR1 w/ EMG's.

 

 

How many layers of rhythms are on the newest CD for a typical song?

Bernie:
Two tracks of direct guitars from the Pods, and two tracks of miked cabinets with amps.

 

 

Were any of the solos improvised or do you prefer to map them out note for note and practice them before going to the studio?

Bernie:
It depended on the song. Most of the newer stuff was improvised in the studio. The older stuff we had been playing for a while at rehearsal, so the solos were already mapped out.

Juan:
Yeah, it was mostly improvised but you have your intro to the solo figured out most of the time. I like to map solos out but never note for note. Bernie will pretty much improvise as well, of course on the harmony solos in mainly figured out ahead of time.

 

 

One of the MANY highlights of the album is the instrumental “Kontrol”. Did this song begin as an instrumental and how did it come together?

Bernie:
We didn't originally intend to write an instrumental, but after we wrote most of the album, we had all these cool riffs left over that didn't fit the other songs. So we made some of those riffs fit together somehow, then Juan and I came up with the solos later. The middle section with the galloping part was written by me and Mike Zaputil back in '86 when Agent Steel was in Holland. So it's kinda cool that it worked it's way into the song.

Juan:
Like Bernie said it was some left over riffs that we did not want to waste; I improvised some wah pedal stuff on the slower solo section; Bernie did some ripping leads. It worked out pretty well...the icing was of course the sample since I am a big sci-fi fan.

 

 

Yeah, I loved the “Outer Limits” intro to the song…why did you leave the spoken part out where the narrator actually says the words “the outer limits”?

Juan:
To piss people off....no actually it was left off so the listener would wonder a bit about the sample; instead of actually knowing where it came from. I know some of the younger kids probably have no idea of "The outer limits" series.

 

 

Do you prefer the classic b/w Outer Limits to the newer ones or do you just like one?

Bernie:
Anything in black and white always comes out creepier.

Bruce Hall:
I like 'em both but I think the older ones were way more eerie.

Juan:
I agree with Bruce; both of them are awesome.

 

 

Speaking of the Outer Limits….since Agent Steel is known for these “X-files” style of lyrics, do you think those ideas about aliens are getting overdone because several other bands have written lyrics about aliens, the rise of Atlantis…and then you have TV and movies with the sci-fi stuff…. Do you have to find other interesting things to write about or will you stick to writing about the sci-fi things?!

Bruce Hall:
I really don't spend much time writing about aliens, overtly anyway. I'd rather talk about the shadow govt., world conspiracies, and things of that nature.

Juan:
It's a bit overdone now definitely but I am still into it a bit; not as much as in the past. I like reading about remote viewing, Alien abductions, underground tunnels, conspiracies of the inner earth, stuff like is pretty cool reading material.

 

 

What is the song “Earth under Lucifer” about (perhaps this relates back to the “Order of the Illuminati” title)?

Bruce Hall:
Earth Under Lucifer is about the leader of the NWO sending a nuclear weapon to the planet Jupiter, detonating the weapon and igniting the gasseous mass of the planet creating a second sun, hence renamed Lucifer. It is about a symbol of control. I like all the songs on the record and each will make sense if you read the lyrics.

 

 

What does the front cover of "Order Of the Illuminati" represent? It looks damn cool and is definitely better than Omega's cover to be honest with you...

Bruce Hall:
To me, it represents the fact that even when a record label tells you you have total artistic control, you really don't. Glad you like it, though.

Juan:
What Bruce means is that we had the U.S. cover which was more basic with a desert scene and 2 suns in the sky and our record company wanted something more interesting which we all agree was the right choice from a marketing perspective (specially in Europe) where CD covers are a focus point to retailers. The main thing is of course the music but our label in Europe wanted something more interesting and we agreed with them it was the right choice. It worked out well because there are 2 different CD covers (kinda like when released Judas Priest when they had Point of Entry).

 

So there are two covers. One has the “bent over people” and mine has a similar scene without the people there!?!

Bruce Hall:
The one without the dudes looking in holes was the original cover. It wasn't deemed metal enough by the label.

Juan:
I think Scarlet (European label) just wanted something more interesting and they thought the U.S. version was a bit plain that is all (it's not a question that it wasn't metal enough) obviously it's about the music not the cover. It was about marketing and I totally understand this working at a label and dealing with retailers and distributors.

 

 

Another thing that I think has improved since Omega is the vocals. Bruce has also outdone himself with the vocals on here and has really blown me away! Did a lot more time go into the vocals for this album or has he just gotten better?

Bernie:
I think Bruce just found his niche. He came into the band under the pressure of filling someone else's shoes, and had to prove himself without pissing off our older fans. He did prove himself and now he can pretty much do whatever he wants.

Bruce Hall:
I don't think I am any better or worse. I am just doing things different than the last time because I had more control over the music I had to sing over. Vocals are dictated by the music and sometimes things are just more extreme. I know on OC I was doing things that may have been harder for people to listen to but I don't see them as worse. OOTI was written with the vocals in mind moreso than the last record. It didn't take longer to record; in fact, I don't even think I sang a total of 20 hours to do the entire thing, just like last time.

 

 

The bonus track for the Japanese release of the new album is called “Brainwashed”. This was released a little bit earlier from some music sites for downloading, but you however was added to the Japanese version!? How many tracks have you released for free net downloading?

Juan: We have did released "Brainwashed" as a free download with a company musicblitz but they no longer exist and in Japan CDs are so expensive that it is only fair to give them a bonus track and we thought it was a good idea to give the Japanese territory an extra track that was no longer available on the internet. I think for a very limited time a demo version of "Forever Black" was available as well but of course no longer.

 

 

Did putting some mp3 files on the net get more attention from the metal public?! Did you even calculate how many times those tracks were downloaded from your site?

Bruce Hall:
Again, getting positive responses is always nice.

Juan:
We really didn't keep track of the downloads, but I am sure it was a lot because we were getting good responses from the "free downloads". People like "free" stuff; specially "free beer".

Bernie:
The idea of putting up rough mixes was great. That was Juan's idea. It created interest while we were still recording and mixing. Plus, it was incentive for me to make sure the final mix sounded great.

 

 

The response was definitely outstanding…. were you flattered when the response was nothing but great toward those clips?

Juan:
It was nice and much appreciated that's for sure.

 

 

For the last album you did a video for “It’s not what you think” – will there be a new video coming soon? If so tell us about it!!

Bernie:
That video was absolutely grueling to make. It was shot in one night, and we were there til 5 in the morning...trying to look cool.

Juan:
Me, and Bruce has talked about it, but we have not really discussed it with the rest of the band. I want to definitely make a video for a song off the new album. Of course we need to figure out the budget/finances that sort of stuff. Something simple like live footage would be cool as well. I was speaking to a company in Poland to shoot some footage on the European tour but the tour date in Warsaw, Poland got changed to Germany so now it looks like when we return to Europe in 2004 we will shoot a professional video.

 

 

Juan, Do you want to keep WWIII completely a separate thing from AS - so you don't mix the label and the band together? Also on the WWIII front - how much of your time does WWIII take in an average week and are you looking to sign any up and coming bands? Now that you’ve had time to see the music business from the other side of things, what do you think of it? Would you prefer to just be a musician or has this taught you a lot?

Juan: all great questions; first of all I am no longer affiliated with WWIII (they changed distributors) and I am now working with another record company more behind the scenes and I would like to keep it that way because then all these bands are calling trying to get a deal if you know what I mean. WWIII took 40 plus hours a week of work of course it never ends and I enjoyed it because it was definitely Metal; Jerry Battle the president of WWIII found some killer bands like ABORYM, VOID OF SILENCE, FOG, HATE so he deserves big props for that. I of course like to keep AGENT STEEL separate from actually executive decisions with record business, two separate monsters. Seeing things from the recording business end of things is good and bad at the same time; bottomline is if a record company is into the band and if it's properly marketed, promoted and the key word here is TOUR SUPPORT is granted then the bad has a chance to succeed. I prefer to be a musician of course no doubt about it, but I ain't complaining either....working for a record company gives you the opportunity to gain knowledge of the recording industry and that is always a good thing.

 

 

Juan, have you ever thought of reforming Evil Dead, or somehow re-releasing the old Evil Dead albums? Isn't it weird that Evil Dead doesn’t have that huge cult following like Agent Steel does?!

Juan:
Scarlet will be re-issuing the past catalog in Europe; we are negotiating this now. EvilDead was special to me because it was the first project I was involved with after I left AGENT STEEL in the 80's; the music was thrashier than AGENT STEEL and the true metal people are aware of EvilDead.

 

 

As for the reunited Abattoir… As far as I know you were supposed to do some co-work with your ex-band, how is it right now, did anything happen?

Juan:
We talked about it but let's face it working at a label, and keeping AGENT STEEL moving forward takes up a lot of hours in a day. It is very difficult for me to commit to another project and give 100 percent. Abattoir has a finished new album that they I assisted in shopping (it needs to be remix that's for sure) but the songs are strong; the problem is that it cannot be remixed because the masters can't be located and they were erased, so I think they will release it underground style through the website; it's a shame because the songs that they recorded were really good.

 

Juan, are you kinda surprised that Steve Gaines went and joined Jim Durkin's bands: Pagan WarMachine and Dreams Of Damnation?! What do you think of both bands?

Juan:
Not really, Steve is a hard worker and he likes to perform live. Gaines is into metal and he gets along with Durkin really good and they've come up with some solid new songs. I have not seen them live with Steve yet but DOD is solid!!!!

 

 

Steve Gaines was only on the first Abattoir album and left like you did. The line up on the second album had only two guys left from the line up of the first album, did you face some personal problems?!

Juan:
At the time yes, but we are all friends now. Abattoir could of been real popular I remember opening up for Metallica when Cliff Burton was in the band and Lars and James were supporters of Abattoir but if I didn't leave AGENT STEEL would of never happened.

 

 

Juan, do you think it is a little bit funny all those bands Agent Steel, Holy Terror, Evil Dead are all linked together in one-way or another? I mean, you played on the Abattoir album and then left to carry on with Agent Steel and then Kurt Corfelt left AS for Holy Terror and the Agent Steel split up you formed Evil Dead with Mel Sanchez from Abattoir?!? And Agent Steel has Karlos Medina from Evil Dead on the bass…etc. And now Gaines is in both Abattoir and Pagan Warmachine..hmm.. what else..Did I miss something?!?

Juan:
I think you covered it all; after EvilDead me and Karlos had a Spanish Metal band called TERROR wo released an album in Mexico called "Hijos de Los Cometas" and Rigo Amezcua the current AGENT STEEL drummer played on half the album, and the other half of the drum tracks were recorded by Jon Dette who also played in TESTAMENT, and was the touring drummer for SLAYER. We are all one Metal family over here on the West Coast!!!!!

 

 

Juan, you started out in the music business way back with Abattoir on Metal Massacre IV for Metal Blade. It’s been quite a few years since then and I was hoping you could perhaps talk a little but about what have been some of the most important things you’ve learned about the “business” in that time. Also, is there anything you wish you’d done differently (hindsight is always 20/20!).

Juan:
I've learned that professionalism is very important, but networking and being around positive people is even more important. I've learned good work ethics is valuable and practice, practice, and more practice only sharpen your metal skills. I've also learned that if you got nothing good to say about someone, don't say anything because the metal business community is small and the same people you see on the way up; you will se on the way down.

 

 

Briefly, before Agent Steel reformed for the Omega Conspiracy writing/recording what were you doing?

Bernie:
I just finished a tour with Fates Warning for their live CD, and before that I was in a aggressive progressive metal band called Paincorp, which is on the shelf right now, but will eventually release something in the future when my time frees up. Yeah right.

Juan:
I was working on TERROR.

 

 

Century Media reissued your older albums in 1999, yet in 1999 “Omega Conspiracy” was released by Candlelight in Europe and Metal Blade in the USA. Did Century offer the band a deal in 1999 and how did they get the rights to reissue your classic albums?

Bernie:
Who the hell knows? I never saw a dime from Mad Locust Rising nor Unstoppable Force. Well, at least someone's making money off that stuff. And we weren't offered a deal by CM, although we sent them a demo, and I guess they didn't go for it. I must admit, the demo didn't sound anything like Agent Steel, so I guess I can't blame them.

Juan:
For what I understand; Century Media purchased the complete Combat catalog which is now owned by Sony Music and released it in Europe only.

 

 

Do you have the rights to reissue your older albums again on Scarlet or any other label?

Juan:
Like I said we will re-issue EVILDEAD catalog for 2004 through Scarlet for Europe and through Artillery Music for the U.S.; regarding the past catalog of AGENT STEEL; I need to research it but for what I understand Sony owns the rights.

 

 

In a couple days Agent Steel will set off for a Euro tour with Exodus, Nuclear Assault and Behemoth and so on ("The Bonded By Metal Over Europe 2003” – Exodus, Nuclear Assault, Agent Steel, God Dethroned, Mortician, Grave, Carnal Forge, Callenish Circle, Occult). How did you get on this festival-like tour and what do you think of the line-up?

Bernie: 
Sounds like too much testosterone. But then again, that's what metal has always been. As long as there's enough beer, everyone should get along, and I'm sure the fans will dig the variety.

Juan:
I think it's a cool metal line-up maybe too much metal, and let's not forget another support band Prospect who has a great singer, and great guitarist (they are from Slovania) and are a bit progressive.

 

 

How long will you get to play, and will you play different setlists every night?

Bernie:
I think we only have 45 minutes to play. And for our own sanity, we will probably change up the set when we start getting bored with the same setlist every night.

 

 

Do you prefer these festival like tours to a typical 2-3 band tour?

Bernie:
This is a first for me. I can't possibly see how everyone will be able to shower on a regular basis! So everyone, bring DEODORANT!

Juan:
I prefer 3 - 4 bands max.

 

 

You did the first Euro tour with the current line up with Flotsam and Jetsam and Anvil as far as I can remember, what kind of reception did you get back then?!

Bernie:
It was actually Riot and Anvil, and the response was awesome. More than what we could've hoped for. Every show was great, but some of the shows we just completely annihilated.

Juan:
Actually our very first European tour was with ANTHRAX and OVERKILL and it was called the "Speed Metal Attack" back in 1986. We did tour with Riot, Anvil, and Domine in 1999-2000 the same year the Rams won the Superbowl.

 

 

After this festival tour – will there be any sort of North American tour dates or any other countries you might be visiting?

Bernie:
To me, North America is still new territory for us. We've only played the East and West Coast states. It would be really nice to hook up on a real North American tour and get some recognition in our own country. Japan and Australia would be a dream come true, but that'll come in time.

Juan:
I am always into touring and it would be great for AGENT STEEL to do a complete North American tour.

 

 

What kind of a North American tour would you like to be on? Perhaps a tour with Cage might make sense...or would you love to land an opening spot on a bigger band's tour?

Bernie:
Definitely a bigger a band. I really don't have any more patience and energy for substandard clubs and P.A.'s and crappy motels. It doesn't do the music nor the band justice. Shitty tours break up great bands. I don't want that happening to us.

Juan:
My dream tour would be supporting IRON MAIDEN or JUDAS PRIEST. I would also like to do some dates with CAGE (I think their new album crushes!).

 

 

Have you begun to look forward to the next album or write any new songs? I hope you do soon because no one wants another 4-year wait! :-) 

Bernie:
We are actually bringing a 4-track recorder on the road so we can start writing the next album. And in my experience, songs written on tour simply kick ass. It's a different energy than sitting in a rehearsal room or your bedroom or studio. You're on a bus, everyone stinks, people are pissed off and hungry. That makes for great songwriting.

 

If you have any other news or would like to say anything else to the readers please do so here… Thanks for you time and good luck with the European tour!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Juan:
I look forward to putting songs together for a new A.S. album for 2004 and also we are releasing a single entitled "Earth Under Lucifer" with bonus live tracks (which is available now) in Europe through Scarlet and soon here in the United States.


Reviews for ORDER OF THE Illuminati

EvilG's Review / Arto's Review

Other Interviews
2001 - Juan Garcia and Bernie Versailles

Official Agent Steel Website
www.agentsteelonline.com