In Flames / Nevermore / Shadow's Fall

Live At The Satyricon, Portland, OR
December 8, 2000

Reviewed by Michael De Los Muertos
Pictures and Commentary by Ice Maiden

Once in a while, often after a long drought of shows during which you begin to feel a certain skepticism that the citizens of your hometown may ever appreciate metal like they used to, a show comes along that reaffirms your faith.  You go in to a slate of excellent bands recognizing the potential the show has to be truly over the top, yet given recent events you’re almost afraid to be too hopeful, lest you be disappointed when the lights come back up.  You’ve heard most of your friends are going, but still count on a couple of missing faces.  Not quite sure what to expect, you go in, grab a beer, start listening to the music, and find yourself on a short, slippery slope to a flaming metal Valhalla that teaches you all over again what metal is all about, and why you love it so much.

Michael De Los Muertos, Warell Dane (Nevermore), Ice MaidenThis show was like that.  Three bands packed in a sweaty club on a Friday night, and all of them turned in top-notch, stellar performances that stoked the vibe of the crowd in exactly the right way to cause a virtual chain-reaction of holy metalness that you just couldn’t help getting caught up in.  With the exception of Wacken, In Flames/Nevermore is the best metal show I’ve seen in the year 2000, and probably (Wacken again excepted) the best metal show I’ve seen since Death and HammerFall razed the same club to the ground back in 1998.  I’m not sure I can even describe this show in any meaningful way, or at least do so without baring more of myself than I probably ought to in a metal show review.

We arrived at Satyricon on a rainy, bitterly cold, windswept Friday night that was a little ominous.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  O.K., Muertos isn't giving the full background here.  He and I work together, and Friday night was also the night of our firm's "Holiday Party" at the local country club.  We knew we had to attend this company event, but we also knew that we would NOT miss a metal show, especially one with such an incredible line-up.  So, after work, we changed into formal wear and, after a discussion about which tie Muertos should wear that would be most offensive to the "must wear a tie" policy of the country club, went to the company party, at which we stayed for about an hour and a half.  Basically, it was a chance to gulp down free alcoholic beverages.  We then quick-changed again and headed over to the venue.  I only give this background so that you will understand our emotions as we entered Satyricon—the stark contrast as we left the shackles of the corporate shmooze-fest world for the vibrant world of METAL.  It was a very "Calgon, take me away" moment).    We could almost feel the power of metal tugging at us as we went inside.  We arrived a bit late and found SHADOW'S FALL already in-progress.  I didn’t see the beginning of the set, but judging from the energy they were putting out midway through when we walked in, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had come on-stage with a pretty furious intensity from the get-go.  This was thrashy sorta-death-metal from a band I’m not very familiar with.  The mallcore-ish dreadlocks on the lead singer had me skeptical at first, but I have to say Shadow’s Fall treaded very carefully and gave the crowd exactly what they wanted – hard, punishing metal.  The perfect opening band is like a great appetizer before a big meal.  Ideally the appetizer is a little meaty, very tasty, and gets you prepared for the main course while still giving you something a little different than what you’ll be eating later.  Shadow’s Fall, therefore, was the perfect opening band, whetting our appetites admirably for the main course(s).  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Hmmm….Shadow's Fall was fine, but to use Muertos' analogy, they were a little more like Cheese Whiz on a Ritz cracker than a fine brie on a baguette to me.  They got the job done, but I certainly wouldn't go out of my way looking for them in my local grocery store. ;) )

The anticipation for NEVERMORE was a juggernaut.  Part of this may be from the fact that much of the Portland metal crew I hang out with is comprised of die-hard Nevermore fans, and their energy was infectious as we waited for the arrival of their patron band.  I didn’t even mind the fact that I couldn’t get a Black Butte Porter at the bar (tap was busted!) and had to settle for India Pale Ale.  This was my first time for Nevermore and I have to say I had high expectations, hearing my friends praise Warrel Dane frequently and express repeated awe at the intensity of Dreaming Neon Black and Politics Of Ecstasy and various other reputed masterpieces from this thoughtful Seattle power act.  When Nevermore finally did take the stage, I was surprised and impressed.  Riffs were very thick and heavy, on-stage energy and charisma was very high, and the carping I’d been hearing about frontman Warrel Dane flirting a bit too much with a mallcore image seemed completely unfounded.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Ummm…Muertos?  He was wearing a weird tight little black leather jacket.  I don't know if I would call it mallcore, but he was certainly trying for some image that was….errr…different from your average pure metal vocalist.  Not that an outfit or clothing make a band-- far from it-- and the music was definitely true metal, but I did find the outfit strange.)  Indeed, he was metal to the core, and knew that the crowd wasn’t here to see anything other than a real metal band.  I confess as a first-timer to Nevermore I’m not really familiar with their set list and can’t offer a truly informed opinion as to what it covered and what it didn’t, but hey, that’s what Ice Maiden is here for!  The band did play some tunes from their new album, including the title track to “Dead Heart in a Dead World,” and the odd cover of the Simon & Garfunkel song “The Sound of Silence.”  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Oi!  Fabulous set list, I thought.  They started with "Narcosynthesis" at top energy, and played "The River Dragon Has Come", "Evolution 169", and quite a few off of Politics of Ecstasy and Dreaming Neon Black.  I guess it was too much to hope for the title track to DNB (even I admit it would have been a little slow for this show), but other than that there was a great mix of their old and new stuff.)  However, I can report truthfully that the energy of the crowd was ratcheted steadily up, song by song, until by the end of the Nevermore set the die-hard fans (including my friends) were getting up on stage, shouting along to every word, and generally raising hell.  I was close enough to these guys to nearly have to duck to avoid being hit by bass guitar necks and microphone cords snapping through the air with impassioned force.  Indeed, I can’t really pick any bones with the Nevermore set at all, and having the pleasure of meeting Warrel Dane after the show was merely an added bonus!  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  This show was pure heaven in terms of proximity to bands and (almost) crowd type.  Aside from the occasional freak who decided he was going to become a mosh-pit all by his lonesome, the crowd was pure metal, and was surging forward to scream along with the band.  EVERYONE in the front few rows was head-banging like crazy, and I was lucky enough to be right in the very front, center-stage, in spittin' distance from the band.  Since the lads from Nevermore were literally less than a foot away from me, they started hamming for the camera, which is why you'll see more than one tongue-shot in my pictures.  What was also cool is that most of the band members came out into the crowd after they played, to mix with the crowd and cheer the other bands on.  Ahhhh….metal bliss….)   

With these two acts behind us, the pent-up energy inside Satyricon’s grimy, band-sticker-covered walls as we waited for IN FLAMES was truly frightening.  Again I was almost afraid to be optimistic.  In Flames played a badly-organized show at the Pine Street Theater in August, on the unfortunate bill which included Earth Crisis, and I was hoping they’d take advantage of better surroundings, better sound and a much better crowd.  Luckily I wasn’t disappointed.  These melodic Gothenburg deathsters, who have taken a completely vicious and unnecessary slagging during this Y2K, opened with the astonishing “Bullet Ride” from their new Clayman album, and it was a perfect choice to announce that In Flames had arrived to kick everybody’s ass.  Guitars roared, drums blazed, Anders screamed, and through it all they wove a tapestry of molten metallurgy that left no corner of the place – and indeed no one in that room – unmoved by the power they exuded.  One blast followed another, with a fair amount of stuff from earlier albums including Jester Race and Whoracle, but for me the ultimate moment of the entire show came during the Clayman song “Only For The Weak.”  During this song, played with ultimate bone-rattling power that only the greatest of metal bands could muster, the wonderful loudness and heaviness of the music finally wove together with a beauty that was nothing short of astonishing.  Once in a while a band’s music can be like a scalpel, cutting through and stripping away levels of your consciousness until it leaves, open and exposed, an open, raw, emotional core, unsullied by any shred of rational (or irrational) coloration which changes your purely visceral response to the music.  In Flames did that, and in that moment nothing existed outside of that room, and the whole universe became metal.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  At this point, you are probably reading and thinking that we are a bunch of cheese-balls.  The whole universe became metal?  What?  Unless you've experienced one of those perfect concert moments, you can't understand it.  This is one of those times when it all came together, when we all came together.   The crowd was on fire.  Everyone was singing in unison.  The bands were having fun and it showed—Jesper couldn't help himself, every so often he would break out into his Cheshire Cat smile.  They played a set list very similar to the show we saw a few months back—"Bullet Ride," "Clayman" and "Pinball Map" off of Clayman, along with "Episode 666", "Embody the Invisible," "Scorn," "Ordinary Story" and "Food for the Gods" are the ones I remember—but this time it was….intoxicating.)  

The audience on hand appeared to be very pure.  While some of my friends complained of seeing posers, I don’t recall seeing any mallcore T-shirts or anything else that was obviously non-metal.  Thankfully there was not a mosh pit that was fully active for the entire show.  A few times some weird isolated incidents of moshing broke out spontaneously, but it was clear that most people at the front of the stage were interested in just hearing and experiencing the bands.  There was some tussle up front at one point, though I can’t say it seriously detracted from the show for me.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Anders and Jesper were so close to us in the front that at some point I got knocked in the head by Anders' microphone stand and he had to pat my head in apology, and all of us in the first row developed personal relationships with the sharp points of Jesper's guitar).

For all my corny sentimentality I can express only one real truth about this show, and that was that it kicked ass.  It was nearly perfect in every way: a cozy club setting on a cold late-autumn night, surrounded by nearly all of my friends, with good beer, good cheer and three bands that presented top-notch performances.  When the show was over it felt like the very air was still ringing with its aura.  Friends chatted, band roadies struck equipment – I got my T-shirt signed by Jesper Stromblad! – but all of us were pretty much dazed, or at least it seemed that way to me.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  With Warrel sitting right there at the bar, I decided to ask him for some pics.  He ended up talking to us for a bit about the tour, the cancellation of Dark Tranquillity from the bill, and the Metal-Rules.com site.  He said that this tour was surprising in that every single show had been fun for the band.  All I can say is that if I could play with those folks, I'd be having fun, too.  Note to self—practice guitar more.)  So we shuffled out into the cold December night, smelling like cigarette smoke, covered in sweat, our ears ringing, and our hearts full of metal.  This is what it’s like to be a metalhead, and why it’s all worth it.  If I ever come to question metal or my devotion to it, I dare say it won’t take me long to come back to my senses.  I need only remember this show, and others like it.

All photos ©Metal-Rules.com
Permission to use, copy and distribute documents and related graphics available from this webzine is only permitted with express permission of Metal-Rules.com

Nevermore - Live

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In Flames - Live

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Shadows Fall - Live

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Wednesday, December 26, 2001

Metal Rules!!: Nevermore, In Flames, Shadows Fall...LIVE!  


In Flames / Nevermore / Shadow's Fall

Live At The Satyricon, Portland, OR
December 8, 2000

Reviewed by Michael De Los Muertos
Pictures and Commentary by Ice Maiden

Once in a while, often after a long drought of shows during which you begin to feel a certain skepticism that the citizens of your hometown may ever appreciate metal like they used to, a show comes along that reaffirms your faith.  You go in to a slate of excellent bands recognizing the potential the show has to be truly over the top, yet given recent events you’re almost afraid to be too hopeful, lest you be disappointed when the lights come back up.  You’ve heard most of your friends are going, but still count on a couple of missing faces.  Not quite sure what to expect, you go in, grab a beer, start listening to the music, and find yourself on a short, slippery slope to a flaming metal Valhalla that teaches you all over again what metal is all about, and why you love it so much.

Michael De Los Muertos, Warell Dane (Nevermore), Ice MaidenThis show was like that.  Three bands packed in a sweaty club on a Friday night, and all of them turned in top-notch, stellar performances that stoked the vibe of the crowd in exactly the right way to cause a virtual chain-reaction of holy metalness that you just couldn’t help getting caught up in.  With the exception of Wacken, In Flames/Nevermore is the best metal show I’ve seen in the year 2000, and probably (Wacken again excepted) the best metal show I’ve seen since Death and HammerFall razed the same club to the ground back in 1998.  I’m not sure I can even describe this show in any meaningful way, or at least do so without baring more of myself than I probably ought to in a metal show review.

We arrived at Satyricon on a rainy, bitterly cold, windswept Friday night that was a little ominous.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  O.K., Muertos isn't giving the full background here.  He and I work together, and Friday night was also the night of our firm's "Holiday Party" at the local country club.  We knew we had to attend this company event, but we also knew that we would NOT miss a metal show, especially one with such an incredible line-up.  So, after work, we changed into formal wear and, after a discussion about which tie Muertos should wear that would be most offensive to the "must wear a tie" policy of the country club, went to the company party, at which we stayed for about an hour and a half.  Basically, it was a chance to gulp down free alcoholic beverages.  We then quick-changed again and headed over to the venue.  I only give this background so that you will understand our emotions as we entered Satyricon—the stark contrast as we left the shackles of the corporate shmooze-fest world for the vibrant world of METAL.  It was a very "Calgon, take me away" moment).    We could almost feel the power of metal tugging at us as we went inside.  We arrived a bit late and found SHADOW'S FALL already in-progress.  I didn’t see the beginning of the set, but judging from the energy they were putting out midway through when we walked in, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had come on-stage with a pretty furious intensity from the get-go.  This was thrashy sorta-death-metal from a band I’m not very familiar with.  The mallcore-ish dreadlocks on the lead singer had me skeptical at first, but I have to say Shadow’s Fall treaded very carefully and gave the crowd exactly what they wanted – hard, punishing metal.  The perfect opening band is like a great appetizer before a big meal.  Ideally the appetizer is a little meaty, very tasty, and gets you prepared for the main course while still giving you something a little different than what you’ll be eating later.  Shadow’s Fall, therefore, was the perfect opening band, whetting our appetites admirably for the main course(s).  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Hmmm….Shadow's Fall was fine, but to use Muertos' analogy, they were a little more like Cheese Whiz on a Ritz cracker than a fine brie on a baguette to me.  They got the job done, but I certainly wouldn't go out of my way looking for them in my local grocery store. ;) )

The anticipation for NEVERMORE was a juggernaut.  Part of this may be from the fact that much of the Portland metal crew I hang out with is comprised of die-hard Nevermore fans, and their energy was infectious as we waited for the arrival of their patron band.  I didn’t even mind the fact that I couldn’t get a Black Butte Porter at the bar (tap was busted!) and had to settle for India Pale Ale.  This was my first time for Nevermore and I have to say I had high expectations, hearing my friends praise Warrel Dane frequently and express repeated awe at the intensity of Dreaming Neon Black and Politics Of Ecstasy and various other reputed masterpieces from this thoughtful Seattle power act.  When Nevermore finally did take the stage, I was surprised and impressed.  Riffs were very thick and heavy, on-stage energy and charisma was very high, and the carping I’d been hearing about frontman Warrel Dane flirting a bit too much with a mallcore image seemed completely unfounded.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Ummm…Muertos?  He was wearing a weird tight little black leather jacket.  I don't know if I would call it mallcore, but he was certainly trying for some image that was….errr…different from your average pure metal vocalist.  Not that an outfit or clothing make a band-- far from it-- and the music was definitely true metal, but I did find the outfit strange.)  Indeed, he was metal to the core, and knew that the crowd wasn’t here to see anything other than a real metal band.  I confess as a first-timer to Nevermore I’m not really familiar with their set list and can’t offer a truly informed opinion as to what it covered and what it didn’t, but hey, that’s what Ice Maiden is here for!  The band did play some tunes from their new album, including the title track to “Dead Heart in a Dead World,” and the odd cover of the Simon & Garfunkel song “The Sound of Silence.”  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Oi!  Fabulous set list, I thought.  They started with "Narcosynthesis" at top energy, and played "The River Dragon Has Come", "Evolution 169", and quite a few off of Politics of Ecstasy and Dreaming Neon Black.  I guess it was too much to hope for the title track to DNB (even I admit it would have been a little slow for this show), but other than that there was a great mix of their old and new stuff.)  However, I can report truthfully that the energy of the crowd was ratcheted steadily up, song by song, until by the end of the Nevermore set the die-hard fans (including my friends) were getting up on stage, shouting along to every word, and generally raising hell.  I was close enough to these guys to nearly have to duck to avoid being hit by bass guitar necks and microphone cords snapping through the air with impassioned force.  Indeed, I can’t really pick any bones with the Nevermore set at all, and having the pleasure of meeting Warrel Dane after the show was merely an added bonus!  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  This show was pure heaven in terms of proximity to bands and (almost) crowd type.  Aside from the occasional freak who decided he was going to become a mosh-pit all by his lonesome, the crowd was pure metal, and was surging forward to scream along with the band.  EVERYONE in the front few rows was head-banging like crazy, and I was lucky enough to be right in the very front, center-stage, in spittin' distance from the band.  Since the lads from Nevermore were literally less than a foot away from me, they started hamming for the camera, which is why you'll see more than one tongue-shot in my pictures.  What was also cool is that most of the band members came out into the crowd after they played, to mix with the crowd and cheer the other bands on.  Ahhhh….metal bliss….)   

With these two acts behind us, the pent-up energy inside Satyricon’s grimy, band-sticker-covered walls as we waited for IN FLAMES was truly frightening.  Again I was almost afraid to be optimistic.  In Flames played a badly-organized show at the Pine Street Theater in August, on the unfortunate bill which included Earth Crisis, and I was hoping they’d take advantage of better surroundings, better sound and a much better crowd.  Luckily I wasn’t disappointed.  These melodic Gothenburg deathsters, who have taken a completely vicious and unnecessary slagging during this Y2K, opened with the astonishing “Bullet Ride” from their new Clayman album, and it was a perfect choice to announce that In Flames had arrived to kick everybody’s ass.  Guitars roared, drums blazed, Anders screamed, and through it all they wove a tapestry of molten metallurgy that left no corner of the place – and indeed no one in that room – unmoved by the power they exuded.  One blast followed another, with a fair amount of stuff from earlier albums including Jester Race and Whoracle, but for me the ultimate moment of the entire show came during the Clayman song “Only For The Weak.”  During this song, played with ultimate bone-rattling power that only the greatest of metal bands could muster, the wonderful loudness and heaviness of the music finally wove together with a beauty that was nothing short of astonishing.  Once in a while a band’s music can be like a scalpel, cutting through and stripping away levels of your consciousness until it leaves, open and exposed, an open, raw, emotional core, unsullied by any shred of rational (or irrational) coloration which changes your purely visceral response to the music.  In Flames did that, and in that moment nothing existed outside of that room, and the whole universe became metal.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  At this point, you are probably reading and thinking that we are a bunch of cheese-balls.  The whole universe became metal?  What?  Unless you've experienced one of those perfect concert moments, you can't understand it.  This is one of those times when it all came together, when we all came together.   The crowd was on fire.  Everyone was singing in unison.  The bands were having fun and it showed—Jesper couldn't help himself, every so often he would break out into his Cheshire Cat smile.  They played a set list very similar to the show we saw a few months back—"Bullet Ride," "Clayman" and "Pinball Map" off of Clayman, along with "Episode 666", "Embody the Invisible," "Scorn," "Ordinary Story" and "Food for the Gods" are the ones I remember—but this time it was….intoxicating.)  

The audience on hand appeared to be very pure.  While some of my friends complained of seeing posers, I don’t recall seeing any mallcore T-shirts or anything else that was obviously non-metal.  Thankfully there was not a mosh pit that was fully active for the entire show.  A few times some weird isolated incidents of moshing broke out spontaneously, but it was clear that most people at the front of the stage were interested in just hearing and experiencing the bands.  There was some tussle up front at one point, though I can’t say it seriously detracted from the show for me.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Anders and Jesper were so close to us in the front that at some point I got knocked in the head by Anders' microphone stand and he had to pat my head in apology, and all of us in the first row developed personal relationships with the sharp points of Jesper's guitar).

For all my corny sentimentality I can express only one real truth about this show, and that was that it kicked ass.  It was nearly perfect in every way: a cozy club setting on a cold late-autumn night, surrounded by nearly all of my friends, with good beer, good cheer and three bands that presented top-notch performances.  When the show was over it felt like the very air was still ringing with its aura.  Friends chatted, band roadies struck equipment – I got my T-shirt signed by Jesper Stromblad! – but all of us were pretty much dazed, or at least it seemed that way to me.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  With Warrel sitting right there at the bar, I decided to ask him for some pics.  He ended up talking to us for a bit about the tour, the cancellation of Dark Tranquillity from the bill, and the Metal-Rules.com site.  He said that this tour was surprising in that every single show had been fun for the band.  All I can say is that if I could play with those folks, I'd be having fun, too.  Note to self—practice guitar more.)  So we shuffled out into the cold December night, smelling like cigarette smoke, covered in sweat, our ears ringing, and our hearts full of metal.  This is what it’s like to be a metalhead, and why it’s all worth it.  If I ever come to question metal or my devotion to it, I dare say it won’t take me long to come back to my senses.  I need only remember this show, and others like it.

All photos ©Metal-Rules.com
Permission to use, copy and distribute documents and related graphics available from this webzine is only permitted with express permission of Metal-Rules.com

Nevermore - Live

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In Flames - Live

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Shadows Fall - Live

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Keeping the Metal Faith Since 1995.

This page last updated on:
Wednesday, December 26, 2001