Concert Reviews

Iron Maiden / Rob Halford / Queensr˙che

Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA
September 19, 2000

Reviewed by Michael De Los Muertos

Pictures from the San Jose/Shoreline Amphitheater Show and Commentary about both the Tacoma and San Jose shows by Ice Maiden


I’m not even really sure how to start the review of this show, or even what to say about it.  To set your mind at ease I’ll cut to the chase: Maiden kicked ass, Halford rocked, and Queensr˙che was much better than expected.  So you won’t be waiting through the review with baited breath to find that out.  However, there certainly were a lot of very depressing things about this show.

Ice Maiden and I, along with several of our friends – some Wacken veterans among them – traveled quite some distance to see this show.  Tacoma is about a three-hour drive from Portland, and we anticipated it would be rough going, particularly at the end as we joined hordes of black-clad metalheads in beat-up cars streaming into the jam-packed parking lot of the Tacoma Dome.  Well – not exactly.  We got there to find the parking lot mysteriously empty.  Oh, there were metalheads, all right; at least a few here and there.  As we walked up to the door, all of us commented, “This is an Iron Maiden show?  Where is everybody?” If this was 1985, twenty minutes before an Iron Maiden arena show thousands of metalheads would be rioting, the ticket booth would be in flames, the parking lot would be awash in illegal liquor and the National Guard would have to be called out to control the masses of metalheads foaming at the mouth shouting “MAIIIDENNNN!” whilst overturning automobiles.  Fifteen years on, the crowd is much smaller, and there’s barely even a ripple of excitement. 

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  OK, this was the first big difference between the San Jose and Tacoma shows.  I flew down to San Jose to see the show there three days before the Tacoma show.  In San Jose, all was as expected.  There were long lines of cars waiting to get into the arena parking.  True old school metalheads were everywhere.  The parking lot was full of blaring stereos, mobile bars were set up on the roofs of cars, the parking attendant was asking ever car if the occupants had any weed—'cause he wanted some, not because he was busting anyone.  Generally, there was pleasantness and excitement.  Everyone seemed psyched and relieved that the show was going to happen—probably in large part because the last two Maiden shows in San Jose were cancelled.  Actually, this was the first time I have ever seen so many cool, laid-back metalheads all in one place on North American soil. The venue in San Jose is an outdoor amphitheater, and there were assigned seats—and the place was chock full.  I was in the 10th row, smack center stage—in spitting distance from the bands.  Glorious!)

Indeed, once inside we discovered that half the Tacoma Dome had been cordoned off – the arena wasn’t even half-full!  We had little time to lament that so few metalheads showed up, because HALFORD blasted on stage in short order.  One good thing about the light crowd was that in the general admission area, you could get up very close and it was like seeing Halford in a club.  This indefatigable god of metal started with “Resurrection,” the title track off his new album which some say portends a Maiden-esque future reunion with Judas Priest.  If that happens, Halford will be in tip-top shape.  His vocals were fantastic and his energy was very high.  He showed the mark of a seasoned metal performer in that he knew how to play the crowd, and get their energy pumped up.  Adding a few Judas Priest songs – such as “Breakin’ The Law” – to his new-album solo stuff was a great choice, and the set list didn’t disappoint.  Indeed about the only negative thing you can say about Halford was that his backing band could use a little work.  His drummer is terrific, but the bassist was below what I’d expect for a musician playing with Rob Halford.  Nonetheless it didn’t detract much from the show, and Halford turned in a top-notch performance.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  I was most impressed by Halford's drummer—the guy was a god!  Amazingly fast and technically proficient.  Plus he was doing cool stick tricks—I'm a sucker for that stuff.  I thought it was interesting that in San Jose Halford gave a shout-out to "all of my good friends in the Castro."  The Castro  is San Fran's notorious gay bar district.  I noted with approval that this very male-dominated, old school appearing crowd did not boo or do any other lame thing in response to Halford's comment.  Bravo, metalheads!)

About the time I wandered away from the beer garden to see QUEENSRźCHE was when I started to notice that it was not just the quantity, but the quality of the crowd which was a problem.  At the standard Queensr˙che set opening of “Anarchy X” and “Revolution Calling” I found myself behind several burly drunk guys who didn’t look much like metalheads, but who were passing around a large bottle of Jim Beam and draping themselves drunkenly on each other.  I chose to forget it and concentrate on the music, which was surprising.  I’d seen Queensr˙che before in 1995 on the God-awful Promised Land tour – those were the days when Geoff Tate wore a tuxedo and white gloves onstage, and a morsel of music from Operation: Mindcrime was handed out only begrudgingly.  This time around Queensr˙che, as a support act, realized they were sandwiched between two of the biggest-ever names in METAL, and decided to behave accordingly.  Their set was much heavier and much catchier than I expected and focused, surprisingly, on old stuff, several tracks from their first two albums and very little from Empire or the sorry post-Empire days.  Score this in the plus category.  In the minus category, there was still precious little from Mindcrime, and I have to agree with Ice Maiden that, although the quality of his voice is terrific, Geoff Tate just doesn’t have the vocal power to really compete with the big boys (Halford, Dickinson, et. al).  Furthermore, the absence of Chris DeGarmo was keenly felt, especially on the climactic number, “Eyes Of A Stranger.”  The new guitarist is neither as technical nor as creative.  However, on the whole Queensr˙che’s performance was much better than I expected, my hopes for this band having been depressed both by the terrible 1995 show I’d seen, and their long (and still unbroken) string of worthless albums after Empire.  Geoff and the boys pleasantly surprised me and I have to say I will probably give Queensr˙che another chance.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  QR definitely put on a better show in Tacoma than they did in San Jose.  I can't explain why, but Tate seemed a little less focused on metal god posing and a little more focused on his singing—just enough to make a difference.  Still, while QR did an admirable job, sandwiched between Halford and Maiden the QR set just seemed like a good time to get things like beer and bathroom breaks out of the way.)

Also I’ll give them a chance out of pity and shame, particularly for Queensr˙che’s drummer.  One of the guys standing near me with the Jim Beam bottle nearly killed him – literally.  After the bottle was drained, one of these drunk assholes – who could give trailer park trash a bad name – disposed of the empty bottle by chucking it at the stage.  It was a magnificent throw, probably 100 feet or more, and cleared Scott Rockenfield’s head by about 6 inches, impacting harmlessly on the curtain behind the drums.  The trailer park assholes gave each other high-fives. It was so big and thrown with so much force that IF THIS BOTTLE HAD HIT SCOTT IN THE HEAD AS IT ALMOST DID, IT PROBABLY WOULD HAVE KILLED HIM.  The sick fuck who threw it just laughed, and moved on from liquor to pot.

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  OK, this is where I rant.  Again, San Jose was entirely cool the whole time.  People were drinking or not, smoking or not, generally just having a good time.  All during the show people were singing and standing and being respectful of each other and the bands.  I had sweet-talked my camera through two security points, by kinda promising I wouldn't take any pics—doh—did they really believe me?-- but when I was snapping pics during Halford a guard saw me and threatened to take my camera unless I stopped.  So I did—until Maiden, when I couldn't control myself.  So my entire row was on the lookout for me, watching for the guards and poking me when one was coming towards us.  True metal camaraderie at its best.

In Tacoma, I was next to the front barrier because I wanted to be close again for Maiden.  I saw two people comatose from some substance get hauled out by security before the show even started.  I saw two more people puke in the middle of the crowd.  I understand people wanting to enjoy substances, but what's the point if you are too zonked to even enjoy the show????  But my main problem is that everyone started doing the push/mosh war thing before Maiden came out.  Then they started full-blown fights.  The guy behind me started groping me, so I squeezed to get out and got caught in a fight.  If it wasn't for one noble metalhead and his large friend, I would have been smooshed.  I elbowed one guy and my two saviors literally picked some folks off of me and escorted me out.  I'm all for moshes in the appropriate places, and being in close quarters for shows, but these folks were animals before, during and after IRON FRICKIN' MAIDEN.  WATCH THE SHOW, YOU LOSERS.) 

The boorish crowd wasn’t nearly as energized as it should have been when IRON MAIDEN finally made their entrance.  The emphasis was clearly on the new album, as the first song was “Brave New World,” and it was actually comforting.  Here was not Iron Maiden reunited with Bruce trying to retread past glories like Kiss Reunion Tour #347 – here was Maiden making a living, promoting a fresh album, moving ahead, and adding yet another chapter to their magnificent saga.  Bruce’s vocals soared, the triple guitars attacked mercilessly, and the feeling of metal was very pure and powerful.  From new stuff to old stuff, Maiden never lost the momentum.  In addition to several Brave New World songs, their delivery of classics like “Two Minutes To Midnight,” “The Trooper” and “Fear Of The Dark” was flawless. 

Unfortunately the crowd almost ruined it.  Midway through “Ghost of the Navigator,” the second song, Bruce got very pissed off at a guy in the front of the stage.  I don’t know what he was doing, but Bruce railed at him, called him a Nazi, said he had no place at the show, and started the whole crowd cheering when security finally pitched him out on his ass.  Bruce then warned the crowd, “Don’t piss me off tonight!”  Kudos, Bruce!  The amount of mayhem and pointless banging around up toward the front of the stage was staggering and depressing.  I wondered what happened to all the true, respectful, even-tempered metal folk who used to show up for Maiden shows.  Were they all at home listening to their Dream Theater albums, or what?  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  For those of you who saw Bruce's rants in other places, what happened in Tacoma was nothing like that.  In San Jose, Bruce had a couple of cute rants, clearly semi-staged to get the crowd pumped and riled.  In Tacoma, some dork threw a bottle at Bruce that barely missed his head, and he stopped singing during all of "Ghost of the Navigator" so he could get the dork thrown out.  He also seemed pissed for real, not just for effect.  In San Jose I was hoarse from singing along with the crowd.  In Tacoma, I was just trying to stop getting groped,  mauled, or trampled.  Go figure which show was more enjoyable.

Unlike San Jose, loads of people in Tacoma didn't seem to know any of the words to the songs, and seemed either bored or pissed that more of the old stuff wasn't played.  Not to belabor a point, but the Ed Hunter Tour last year was the big reunion tour—why should they repeat the same set list again?  I, for one, thought it was cool to hear the Brave New World stuff with a hefty smattering of the classics.)

Maiden’s finale was suitably bombastic, with a 20-foot-tall Iron Maiden – which looked suspiciously like Eddie the Head – gracing the stage for the song “Iron Maiden,” and locked inside said prop were several scantily-clad babes.  The encore, featuring “Number Of The Beast,”  “Hallowed Be Thy Name” and "Sanctuary," capped off the show, if not with an earthquake, then at least with a minor tremor.  Another triumphant performance for Maiden, and well worth the hassle.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Since this was the last stop on the tour, Bruce let the Vestal Virgins out of the Iron Maiden for a bow and short breast exposure.  How nice for you lads in Tacoma!)

While the show itself was a success, I must say it bodes ill for what metal scene I thought there might be in the Northwest.  What kind of world do we live in where Iron Maiden and Rob Halford can’t fill half the Tacoma Dome, and the dregs they do get are a bunch of drunken assholes who throw bottles and beat up innocent bystanders?  Maiden sold out Madison Square Garden in mere hours, and I’ll bet most of the people who came out for that show were true metal.  What’s wrong with Tacoma?

Depressing.  Most depressing.  I can’t think about it any longer.  I gotta go lie down.  Just be sure to wake me when those Eddie the Head dolls they’re making arrive.

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  As I reread this review I feel that it ends on a sour note that no Maiden show deserves.  I think Los Muertos and I both agree that regardless of crowd and surrounding events, Iron Maiden puts on one incredible show.  You can't help but feeling as you watch them that they deserve all the acclaim they get.  Bruce was running like a mad-man and singing like a master, Nicko was drumming for all he was worth, Adrian was unobtrusively ruling his guitar, 'arry was a joy to behold on his bass, Gers was posing like the crazy monkey-boy that he is, and Dave had his silly smile and was doing his little lilting/skipping/walk/stroll thing as he strummed hither and yon around the stage.  These folks—OK, maybe with the exception of Gers--are the old guard of pure metal, and a joy every time.)


All photos ©Metal-Rules.com
Permission to use, copy and distribute documents and related graphics available from this webzine is only permitted with express permission of Metal-Rules.com

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Metal Rules!!: Iron Maiden, Halford, Queensryche  

Concert Reviews

Iron Maiden / Rob Halford / Queensr˙che

Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA
September 19, 2000

Reviewed by Michael De Los Muertos

Pictures from the San Jose/Shoreline Amphitheater Show and Commentary about both the Tacoma and San Jose shows by Ice Maiden


I’m not even really sure how to start the review of this show, or even what to say about it.  To set your mind at ease I’ll cut to the chase: Maiden kicked ass, Halford rocked, and Queensr˙che was much better than expected.  So you won’t be waiting through the review with baited breath to find that out.  However, there certainly were a lot of very depressing things about this show.

Ice Maiden and I, along with several of our friends – some Wacken veterans among them – traveled quite some distance to see this show.  Tacoma is about a three-hour drive from Portland, and we anticipated it would be rough going, particularly at the end as we joined hordes of black-clad metalheads in beat-up cars streaming into the jam-packed parking lot of the Tacoma Dome.  Well – not exactly.  We got there to find the parking lot mysteriously empty.  Oh, there were metalheads, all right; at least a few here and there.  As we walked up to the door, all of us commented, “This is an Iron Maiden show?  Where is everybody?” If this was 1985, twenty minutes before an Iron Maiden arena show thousands of metalheads would be rioting, the ticket booth would be in flames, the parking lot would be awash in illegal liquor and the National Guard would have to be called out to control the masses of metalheads foaming at the mouth shouting “MAIIIDENNNN!” whilst overturning automobiles.  Fifteen years on, the crowd is much smaller, and there’s barely even a ripple of excitement. 

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  OK, this was the first big difference between the San Jose and Tacoma shows.  I flew down to San Jose to see the show there three days before the Tacoma show.  In San Jose, all was as expected.  There were long lines of cars waiting to get into the arena parking.  True old school metalheads were everywhere.  The parking lot was full of blaring stereos, mobile bars were set up on the roofs of cars, the parking attendant was asking ever car if the occupants had any weed—'cause he wanted some, not because he was busting anyone.  Generally, there was pleasantness and excitement.  Everyone seemed psyched and relieved that the show was going to happen—probably in large part because the last two Maiden shows in San Jose were cancelled.  Actually, this was the first time I have ever seen so many cool, laid-back metalheads all in one place on North American soil. The venue in San Jose is an outdoor amphitheater, and there were assigned seats—and the place was chock full.  I was in the 10th row, smack center stage—in spitting distance from the bands.  Glorious!)

Indeed, once inside we discovered that half the Tacoma Dome had been cordoned off – the arena wasn’t even half-full!  We had little time to lament that so few metalheads showed up, because HALFORD blasted on stage in short order.  One good thing about the light crowd was that in the general admission area, you could get up very close and it was like seeing Halford in a club.  This indefatigable god of metal started with “Resurrection,” the title track off his new album which some say portends a Maiden-esque future reunion with Judas Priest.  If that happens, Halford will be in tip-top shape.  His vocals were fantastic and his energy was very high.  He showed the mark of a seasoned metal performer in that he knew how to play the crowd, and get their energy pumped up.  Adding a few Judas Priest songs – such as “Breakin’ The Law” – to his new-album solo stuff was a great choice, and the set list didn’t disappoint.  Indeed about the only negative thing you can say about Halford was that his backing band could use a little work.  His drummer is terrific, but the bassist was below what I’d expect for a musician playing with Rob Halford.  Nonetheless it didn’t detract much from the show, and Halford turned in a top-notch performance.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  I was most impressed by Halford's drummer—the guy was a god!  Amazingly fast and technically proficient.  Plus he was doing cool stick tricks—I'm a sucker for that stuff.  I thought it was interesting that in San Jose Halford gave a shout-out to "all of my good friends in the Castro."  The Castro  is San Fran's notorious gay bar district.  I noted with approval that this very male-dominated, old school appearing crowd did not boo or do any other lame thing in response to Halford's comment.  Bravo, metalheads!)

About the time I wandered away from the beer garden to see QUEENSRźCHE was when I started to notice that it was not just the quantity, but the quality of the crowd which was a problem.  At the standard Queensr˙che set opening of “Anarchy X” and “Revolution Calling” I found myself behind several burly drunk guys who didn’t look much like metalheads, but who were passing around a large bottle of Jim Beam and draping themselves drunkenly on each other.  I chose to forget it and concentrate on the music, which was surprising.  I’d seen Queensr˙che before in 1995 on the God-awful Promised Land tour – those were the days when Geoff Tate wore a tuxedo and white gloves onstage, and a morsel of music from Operation: Mindcrime was handed out only begrudgingly.  This time around Queensr˙che, as a support act, realized they were sandwiched between two of the biggest-ever names in METAL, and decided to behave accordingly.  Their set was much heavier and much catchier than I expected and focused, surprisingly, on old stuff, several tracks from their first two albums and very little from Empire or the sorry post-Empire days.  Score this in the plus category.  In the minus category, there was still precious little from Mindcrime, and I have to agree with Ice Maiden that, although the quality of his voice is terrific, Geoff Tate just doesn’t have the vocal power to really compete with the big boys (Halford, Dickinson, et. al).  Furthermore, the absence of Chris DeGarmo was keenly felt, especially on the climactic number, “Eyes Of A Stranger.”  The new guitarist is neither as technical nor as creative.  However, on the whole Queensr˙che’s performance was much better than I expected, my hopes for this band having been depressed both by the terrible 1995 show I’d seen, and their long (and still unbroken) string of worthless albums after Empire.  Geoff and the boys pleasantly surprised me and I have to say I will probably give Queensr˙che another chance.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  QR definitely put on a better show in Tacoma than they did in San Jose.  I can't explain why, but Tate seemed a little less focused on metal god posing and a little more focused on his singing—just enough to make a difference.  Still, while QR did an admirable job, sandwiched between Halford and Maiden the QR set just seemed like a good time to get things like beer and bathroom breaks out of the way.)

Also I’ll give them a chance out of pity and shame, particularly for Queensr˙che’s drummer.  One of the guys standing near me with the Jim Beam bottle nearly killed him – literally.  After the bottle was drained, one of these drunk assholes – who could give trailer park trash a bad name – disposed of the empty bottle by chucking it at the stage.  It was a magnificent throw, probably 100 feet or more, and cleared Scott Rockenfield’s head by about 6 inches, impacting harmlessly on the curtain behind the drums.  The trailer park assholes gave each other high-fives. It was so big and thrown with so much force that IF THIS BOTTLE HAD HIT SCOTT IN THE HEAD AS IT ALMOST DID, IT PROBABLY WOULD HAVE KILLED HIM.  The sick fuck who threw it just laughed, and moved on from liquor to pot.

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  OK, this is where I rant.  Again, San Jose was entirely cool the whole time.  People were drinking or not, smoking or not, generally just having a good time.  All during the show people were singing and standing and being respectful of each other and the bands.  I had sweet-talked my camera through two security points, by kinda promising I wouldn't take any pics—doh—did they really believe me?-- but when I was snapping pics during Halford a guard saw me and threatened to take my camera unless I stopped.  So I did—until Maiden, when I couldn't control myself.  So my entire row was on the lookout for me, watching for the guards and poking me when one was coming towards us.  True metal camaraderie at its best.

In Tacoma, I was next to the front barrier because I wanted to be close again for Maiden.  I saw two people comatose from some substance get hauled out by security before the show even started.  I saw two more people puke in the middle of the crowd.  I understand people wanting to enjoy substances, but what's the point if you are too zonked to even enjoy the show????  But my main problem is that everyone started doing the push/mosh war thing before Maiden came out.  Then they started full-blown fights.  The guy behind me started groping me, so I squeezed to get out and got caught in a fight.  If it wasn't for one noble metalhead and his large friend, I would have been smooshed.  I elbowed one guy and my two saviors literally picked some folks off of me and escorted me out.  I'm all for moshes in the appropriate places, and being in close quarters for shows, but these folks were animals before, during and after IRON FRICKIN' MAIDEN.  WATCH THE SHOW, YOU LOSERS.) 

The boorish crowd wasn’t nearly as energized as it should have been when IRON MAIDEN finally made their entrance.  The emphasis was clearly on the new album, as the first song was “Brave New World,” and it was actually comforting.  Here was not Iron Maiden reunited with Bruce trying to retread past glories like Kiss Reunion Tour #347 – here was Maiden making a living, promoting a fresh album, moving ahead, and adding yet another chapter to their magnificent saga.  Bruce’s vocals soared, the triple guitars attacked mercilessly, and the feeling of metal was very pure and powerful.  From new stuff to old stuff, Maiden never lost the momentum.  In addition to several Brave New World songs, their delivery of classics like “Two Minutes To Midnight,” “The Trooper” and “Fear Of The Dark” was flawless. 

Unfortunately the crowd almost ruined it.  Midway through “Ghost of the Navigator,” the second song, Bruce got very pissed off at a guy in the front of the stage.  I don’t know what he was doing, but Bruce railed at him, called him a Nazi, said he had no place at the show, and started the whole crowd cheering when security finally pitched him out on his ass.  Bruce then warned the crowd, “Don’t piss me off tonight!”  Kudos, Bruce!  The amount of mayhem and pointless banging around up toward the front of the stage was staggering and depressing.  I wondered what happened to all the true, respectful, even-tempered metal folk who used to show up for Maiden shows.  Were they all at home listening to their Dream Theater albums, or what?  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  For those of you who saw Bruce's rants in other places, what happened in Tacoma was nothing like that.  In San Jose, Bruce had a couple of cute rants, clearly semi-staged to get the crowd pumped and riled.  In Tacoma, some dork threw a bottle at Bruce that barely missed his head, and he stopped singing during all of "Ghost of the Navigator" so he could get the dork thrown out.  He also seemed pissed for real, not just for effect.  In San Jose I was hoarse from singing along with the crowd.  In Tacoma, I was just trying to stop getting groped,  mauled, or trampled.  Go figure which show was more enjoyable.

Unlike San Jose, loads of people in Tacoma didn't seem to know any of the words to the songs, and seemed either bored or pissed that more of the old stuff wasn't played.  Not to belabor a point, but the Ed Hunter Tour last year was the big reunion tour—why should they repeat the same set list again?  I, for one, thought it was cool to hear the Brave New World stuff with a hefty smattering of the classics.)

Maiden’s finale was suitably bombastic, with a 20-foot-tall Iron Maiden – which looked suspiciously like Eddie the Head – gracing the stage for the song “Iron Maiden,” and locked inside said prop were several scantily-clad babes.  The encore, featuring “Number Of The Beast,”  “Hallowed Be Thy Name” and "Sanctuary," capped off the show, if not with an earthquake, then at least with a minor tremor.  Another triumphant performance for Maiden, and well worth the hassle.  (Ice Maiden's Commentary:  Since this was the last stop on the tour, Bruce let the Vestal Virgins out of the Iron Maiden for a bow and short breast exposure.  How nice for you lads in Tacoma!)

While the show itself was a success, I must say it bodes ill for what metal scene I thought there might be in the Northwest.  What kind of world do we live in where Iron Maiden and Rob Halford can’t fill half the Tacoma Dome, and the dregs they do get are a bunch of drunken assholes who throw bottles and beat up innocent bystanders?  Maiden sold out Madison Square Garden in mere hours, and I’ll bet most of the people who came out for that show were true metal.  What’s wrong with Tacoma?

Depressing.  Most depressing.  I can’t think about it any longer.  I gotta go lie down.  Just be sure to wake me when those Eddie the Head dolls they’re making arrive.

(Ice Maiden's Commentary:  As I reread this review I feel that it ends on a sour note that no Maiden show deserves.  I think Los Muertos and I both agree that regardless of crowd and surrounding events, Iron Maiden puts on one incredible show.  You can't help but feeling as you watch them that they deserve all the acclaim they get.  Bruce was running like a mad-man and singing like a master, Nicko was drumming for all he was worth, Adrian was unobtrusively ruling his guitar, 'arry was a joy to behold on his bass, Gers was posing like the crazy monkey-boy that he is, and Dave had his silly smile and was doing his little lilting/skipping/walk/stroll thing as he strummed hither and yon around the stage.  These folks—OK, maybe with the exception of Gers--are the old guard of pure metal, and a joy every time.)


All photos ©Metal-Rules.com
Permission to use, copy and distribute documents and related graphics available from this webzine is only permitted with express permission of Metal-Rules.com

Maiden_venue.jpg (111938 bytes) 3Guitars.jpg (191807 bytes) 3Guitars2.jpg (123970 bytes)
3Guitars3.jpg (135167 bytes) 666_a.jpg (156651 bytes) 666_b.jpg (171611 bytes)
666_c.jpg (174883 bytes) 666_d.jpg (141966 bytes) A_Smith.jpg (116657 bytes)
Adrian_Dave.jpg (137260 bytes) Band1.jpg (135461 bytes) Band2.jpg (113797 bytes)
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BruceBruce4.jpg (110640 bytes) BruceBruce5.jpg (79224 bytes) BruceWithBackdrop.jpg (163806 bytes)
BruceWithFlag.jpg (107883 bytes) BruceWithFlag2.jpg (116281 bytes) Dave.jpg (94467 bytes)
Dave_MrPose.jpg (102547 bytes) DrumGod.jpg (124989 bytes) DrumGod2.jpg (162050 bytes)
Eddy.jpg (80798 bytes) Eddy2.jpg (91910 bytes) GetThatThumbInAndDoItRight.jpg (97066 bytes)
GodsofMetal.jpg (132657 bytes) GodsofMetal_10.jpg (291411 bytes) GodsofMetal_11.jpg (107074 bytes)
GodsofMetal2.jpg (108050 bytes) GodsofMetal3.jpg (101839 bytes) GodsofMetal4.jpg (84628 bytes)
GodsofMetal5.jpg (92937 bytes) GodsofMetal6.jpg (112879 bytes) GodsofMetal7.jpg (110942 bytes)
GodsofMetal8.jpg (192065 bytes) GodsofMetal9.jpg (157437 bytes) ReachingForBruce.jpg (103692 bytes)
S_Harris.jpg (93174 bytes) Stage.jpg (120339 bytes) Stage2.jpg (114341 bytes)
Stage3.jpg (146505 bytes) Stage4.jpg (127617 bytes) Stage5.jpg (141187 bytes)
Stage6.jpg (112546 bytes) Stage7.jpg (140046 bytes) Steve1.jpg (88134 bytes)
SteveandDave.jpg (92629 bytes) SteveandDave2.jpg (113735 bytes) SteveWithMrPose.jpg (96969 bytes)
SteveWithMrPose2.jpg (91292 bytes) SteveWithMrPose3.jpg (92840 bytes)  

Halford

Halford_EndofShow.jpg (142013 bytes) Halford_Stage.jpg (199083 bytes)

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Keeping the Metal Faith Since 1995.

This page last updated on:
Wednesday, December 26, 2001